PRESIDENT ANDREW JOHNSON MUSEUM AND LIBRARY

MUSEUM NEWS

Doak House Museum to host Christmas open house on Saturday, Dec. 8

26 November 2012 by eestes@tusculum.edu

Celebrate the holidays 19th century style at the Doak House Museum Saturday, Dec. 8, during its annual Christmas open house.

The museum on the Tusculum College campus (690 Erwin Hwy.) will be open from 5 -7 p.m.

Free tours will be given at the museum between 5 and 6 p.m. The museum, which was the early 19th century home of Tusculum College co-founder Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, will be decorated for the holidays as it would have been during the 1800s.

Crafts and games for children will be featured during the open house along with a few surprises. Refreshments will be available.

Visitors will be able to explore the Doak House Gift Shop and browse through holiday goodies, period toys and other gift ideas. Special discounts will be given during the open house. Proceeds from sales in the gift shop support the museum’s events and programs.

For more information, call 423-636-8554 or email lwalker@tusculum.edu.

The Doak House Museum and the President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library are operated by the Department of Museum Program and Studies of Tusculum College. In addition to the museums, the department is responsible for the College Archives and offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus. Follow the museums on Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events or visit its Web site at www.tusculum.edu/museums to learn more about the variety of programs offered at the museums

Old Oak at Tusculum College added to Tennessee Tree Register

Posted on 17 October 2012 by srichey@tusculum.edu

The Old Oak, the large, white-oak tree that sits on the Tusculum College campus next to Old College has officially been added to the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council’s Tennessee Landmark and Historic Tree Register.

The tree itself is somewhere between 250 and 300 years old and has remained a noticeable feature in the area since before the Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak founded the college. As result, the oldest building on campus, Old College, was built in the Old Oak’s shade, and the tree has witnessed major events in American history such as the Civil War and Reconstruction, not to mention countless Tusculum students who have spent time beneath the tree’s branches.

According to Dollie Boyd, director of the Museums of Tusculum, a representative from the forestry council visited in April, and he was thrilled with the tree. He called it a “splendid” example of the White Oak variety, and he also said it was very healthy.

“It is great to hear that the tree is healthy and that the best thing we can do to ensure its health is to leave it be. He recommended no interventions of any kind, saying that if it is left alone it could live to be 400 years old.

The Landmark and Historic Tree Register allows for a brief history of the Old Oak to be added to the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council’s website, a plaque commemorating the tree and funding for a sign at the tree’s location. The Old Oak listing can be viewed at http://www.tufc.com/registries.html.

Museums of Tusculum College accepted into the Conservation Assessment Program

02 March 2012 by srichey@tusculum.edu
The Museums of Tusculum College have been accepted into the Conservation Assessment Program.

With their acceptance into the program, the Museums of Tusculum College will be allocated $7,190 from the Heritage Preservation division of the National Institute for Conservation.

The funding will be used to hire a professional conservator to assess the collections and a historic preservation specialist to assess the historic buildings. After the assessment is complete, detailed reports with recommendations for improvements to both museums will be presented to the college.

“We are very excited what participation in this program will mean for the museums,” said Dollie Boyd, interim director of the Museums of Tusculum College.

“This will be a boon to our mission to care for our collections and structures and could also help us in the quest for larger awards in the future,” said Boyd.

The Doak House Museum, President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library, and the College Archives provide access to researchers, tours, public programs and educational opportunities to thousands of visitors annually. Tusculum College offers one of the few undergraduate Museum Studies degree programs in the country. The two museums are also part of the National Historic District on the Tusculum College campus.

Follow the museums on Facebook and Twitter to learn the latest news and upcoming events or visit its Web site at www.tusculum.edu/museums to learn more about the variety of programs offered at the museums

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